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Chromatic aberration

Dudds
Newbie

Hello fellow creators.

I am very much interested in gathering information on exactly how chromatic aberration occurs within photography. Also of interest would be methods or procedures in how to mitigate this from happening, both pre- and post processing.

This is my first ever conversation, please be kind!

3 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

GaryHart
Star Member

Avoiding chromatic aberration starts with having the best quality glass—prime lenses are ideal, but the best zooms are good too. And rather than shooting wide open, stopping down to f/8 to f/11 helps too—I try not to stop down farther than f/11 unless I need to, because the smaller the aperture, the greater the diffraction (an entirely different problem).

In Lightroom Lens Corrections, I usually check the Remove Chromatic Aberration box, but rarely notice much difference. In Photoshop I'll magnify the high contrast edges 100% or more to check for CA—if I see it, I try to adjust it out with the Lens Correction filter. Others might have more elaborate solutions, but since switching to Sony I hardly ever think about CA—possibly because all my lenses are Sony GM or G, and I virtually never shoot wide open. I'll be curious to see what some of the other Artisans have to say about it. 

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DonSmith
Key Contributor

 I concur with Gary, buy really good glass... CA tends to be most pronounced in either very wide-angle or telephoto glass along strong areas of contrast such as a mountain ridge with a vibrant sunrise/sunset sky. With my Sony glass, it is really no longer an issue but I still turn on CA reduction in LR.

View solution in original post

Thank you for your input. Most of the information regarding this topic does seem to be a little too intense, however, your instruction is very clear. As a hobby photographer (with aspirations to become a professional) I will be forcing myself to purchase some of the higher GM quality lenses, and putting it all to the test. 

Thanks again.

View solution in original post

6 REPLIES 6

GaryHart
Star Member

Avoiding chromatic aberration starts with having the best quality glass—prime lenses are ideal, but the best zooms are good too. And rather than shooting wide open, stopping down to f/8 to f/11 helps too—I try not to stop down farther than f/11 unless I need to, because the smaller the aperture, the greater the diffraction (an entirely different problem).

In Lightroom Lens Corrections, I usually check the Remove Chromatic Aberration box, but rarely notice much difference. In Photoshop I'll magnify the high contrast edges 100% or more to check for CA—if I see it, I try to adjust it out with the Lens Correction filter. Others might have more elaborate solutions, but since switching to Sony I hardly ever think about CA—possibly because all my lenses are Sony GM or G, and I virtually never shoot wide open. I'll be curious to see what some of the other Artisans have to say about it. 

Thank you for your input. Most of the information regarding this topic does seem to be a little too intense, however, your instruction is very clear. As a hobby photographer (with aspirations to become a professional) I will be forcing myself to purchase some of the higher GM quality lenses, and putting it all to the test. 

Thanks again.

If you have a limited budget, it's usually best to spend your camera money on the best possible glass than it is to upgrade to latest/greatest body. The lenses will serve you for years, and once you have your lenses squared away, whatever your next camera body is will be better than the one you'd have gotten earlier. Also, the resolution of today's top bodies exceeds the resolving power of all but the best glass, so you're actually wasting money if your body is better than your glass. Good luck with your photography!

DonSmith
Key Contributor

 I concur with Gary, buy really good glass... CA tends to be most pronounced in either very wide-angle or telephoto glass along strong areas of contrast such as a mountain ridge with a vibrant sunrise/sunset sky. With my Sony glass, it is really no longer an issue but I still turn on CA reduction in LR.